Blog Post 13: Missing Connections

Hi everyone,

Hope your heads have cleared from the intertwinings and doublings of Poe’s story yesterday and that you’re seeing your ways towards some downtime over break soon. Obviously there is no response post due tomorrow, but here’s a thread for first day with Gone Girl next Monday when we come back.

As I mentioned yesterday, this final text of the semester presents something of a shift from our path up to now: Flynn’s novel takes place in a realistic, contemporary world, without anything supernatural or otherworldly in it. Part of our task with this text (both in class and in the final paper) will be to make it part of our larger ongoing conversation by connecting it to the rest of our material, so I thought it would be helpful to use this blog post to start that thinking. In your post, you should engage our first chunk of the reading in some way that connects it to the questions and concerns of an earlier text from the semester. You should ground your connection in some of our usual quotation and close analysis of Flynn’s writing (although you don’t need to directly quote the other text you’re connecting it to here). Use that quotation and analysis to make a connection that points at something larger — rather than comparing two characters, for example, think of how and why Flynn and another author address a conceptual issue or question in similar and/or different ways.

One more rule: If you happen to read ahead, or if you’ve seen the film of this novel — please, no spoilers!!

Happy reading and happy break — see you all next week.

Reminder: your response should go in the comments section for this post — click the “Leave a Comment” link at the top of the post. It should be at least 250 words, and is due by midnight on Sunday, November 27th. After class on Monday, you should return to this thread and post a response to one classmate’s post by class time Wednesday the 30th. If you have any questions, let me know via email.

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20 thoughts on “Blog Post 13: Missing Connections

  1. Rebekah Clapham
    Blog Post 13

    One large issue Flynn addresses in her novel Gone Girl is sexism—specifically men’s role in demeaning women. This is highlighted in several parts of the novel but I want to focus specifically on pages 60-61 when the narrator talks about the relationship between his father and his mother. Nick describes that his father thought women “were stupid, inconsequential, irritating. That dumb bitch … was his favorite phrase for any woman who annoyed him” (60). Nick’s father verbally/emotionally abused his wife for years, yet took solace in the fact he never hit her. It is only when his parents separated did Nick’s “thin, pained mother g[et] fat and happy” (61). Nick’s father draws the line at physical abuse but is ok with emotional abuse, suggesting that to him, the opinions, desires, and feelings of women do not matter, thus women are there solely to please him and/or cater to the family. It is symbolic that Nick’s mother gets fat when she finally is separated from her husband—being very thin while being married to Nick’s father implies she believed she was not entitled to space and that Nick’s father made her feel very small and insignificant. Now that she is separated from him, she becomes “fat,” as she regains her confidence and finally believes her feelings are and her existence is valid. The dynamics between Nick and Amy are also not much better. This can be seen in Amy’s July 5th 2010 diary entry, where she describes a fight between her and Nick. Even though he is the one that blows off their anniversary, comes home late and picks a fight with her, and has potentially been unfaithful to Amy, Amy ends up apologizing to him (70). Amy has to swallow her own opinions, anger, and feelings to avoid being the “dancing-monkey” wife and remain the “cool” wife that unconditionally supports her husband. The whole concept of the “dancing-monkey” wife is very demeaning to women, as it basically invalidates any feelings they have. To be seen as a good, “cool” wife, Amy can’t question her husband, set boundaries for him, or voice things that make her uncomfortable. This puts Amy in a role that suggests she is there purely to please her husband and implies that her own personality/wants/desires are insignificant.

    The gender dynamics in this novel reminded me of the gender dynamics in Metamorphosis. Specifically in Metamorphosis, the mother/wife and sister are characterized in a way that suggests their opinions are not worth listening to, and that their own feelings/desires are invalid. Also, the father is portrayed as in charge of all decisions. Specifically, the scene where the father tries to kill his son is symbolic. The father does not respect the mother’s wishes to protect their son/the bug, and aggressively tries to kill him. Throughout the scene, the mother and sister are pleading with the father not to hurt him, but the father ignores them. It is only when the mother uses her sexuality and her body to try and seduce the husband does he begin to listen to her. This suggests that men do not respect women and their opinions, and that the only way women can have power over men is through their sexuality. The mother and sister also have very stereotypical gendered-roles throughout the short story—their job is to feed the bug, clean up after him, and take care of the house for lodgers. The sister even entertains the lodgers by playing her violin for them—suggesting that women are there to entertain men and that their personality or their own opinions do not matter. Both Gone Girl and Metamorphosis focus on these twisted, unequal gender dynamics to criticize the sexist invalidation of women and their feelings.

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  2. Jessica Pavia
    Blog Post 13

    Reading Gone Girl, I found Nick’s hyper-sensitive awareness of his surroundings and self shows similarities to A Cool Million–not in subject matter, but in their shared realistic airs. Something we talked about with A Cool Million was how the story does not concern the supernatural, but it’s over-realistic happenings brings about an otherworldly feeling to the narration. I specifically found a parallel between the two stories when it came to Nick and his internal thoughts. When Nick and Amy’s family are broadcasting the missing daughter, Nick’s thoughts reveal his struggle with what his morality should be. He writes “The news report would show Nick Dunne, husband of the missing woman, standing metallically next to his father-in-law, arms crossed, eyes glazed, looking almost bored as Amy’s parents wept. And then worse…the need to remind people [he] wasn’t a dick…So there is came, out of nowhere, as Rand begged for his daughter’s return: a killer smile” (64). Nick’s inability to understand what the “proper” response is, and his inability to control his responses–as if his mind is separated from his body–hints at both Nick’s selfishness and his inability to exist in the real world. Flynn suggests his personality comes from being the younger sibling, but probably symbolizes something much more. With talking about this text as a supermarket mystery, I think Nick and his hyper-realistic internal being could be making a statement on the readers, much like A Cool Million did with the ignorant America. Our need as readers to separate ourselves from the text and be able to say “I’m not like that” or “my world’s not like that” is being represented by the extreme detail and compensation done by Nick and the characters in A Cool Million.

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    • This makes a lot of sense to compare Nick to Lem in A Cool Million. There is a blindness to both of them because they are too aware of their masculinity and dominance that they are unable to see that people are struggling and are unhappy because of people like them. Amy was unhappy with the way that Nick treated her—he never saw her, he spent time at the bar, he thought she was emotional, and he was irritated by her. There is a superiority aspect to Nick and to Lem who believe that the world revolves around them. Nick might not have to be looking for Amy after her disappearance if he noticed her when they were together. I like that you phrase that A Cool Million is showing “the ignorant America,” which is relatable to our present times and books like Gone Girl. The men are unaware of the women, and the other way around. There is a difference between the two, there are gaps in relationships, and a blindness to understanding each other. The men play football and go to clubs with their friends while the women stay at home and cook casseroles. Amy hates this type of relationship, but it seems to be that she found herself in one anyway.

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      • I also compared it to A Cool Million but not because of the world revolving around the main characters but because of their unfortunate luck. I see your point of view in this aspect because the bad luck comes when people are self centered and only sees themselves in the world. The “blindness” will tell this story of if Nick will make the most of his life or not.

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  3. I haven’t read any of the novel before or seen the film, and was preemptively confused about why this novel was on our reading list, and my initial thoughts on the writing style agree my earlier apprehension. So far the novel just seems like a really surface level read, really diverting from our readings of Morrison which were reader-intensive, and leaving much to interpretation by the reader. Flynn’s writing style is really really detailed and doesn’t leave much work to be done by the reader. All of the inferred information is blatantly explained in plain exposition and internal monologue that makes the characters seem very obvious and to me, annoying. Specifically Flynn’s use of every other chapter as “diary entires” of Amy, filling in her personality and internal monologue where she does not actually appear in the novel herself, seems incredibly contrived and is unbelievable to me. Exposition through diary entries are appropriate for time pieces like Jane Eyre or Victorian novels, but in present day I just can’t believe diary entries supposedly written by an adult woman in New York. I agree with the idea of having Amy’s point of view in the novel, but Flynn’s execution of it via diary entries is completely unbelievable and childish to me. As the novel continued with Nick’s suffering writer mentality and weird pop culture references to quinoa (36) and his meta-themed bar, I just couldn’t really believe him as character.
    I’m not really sure whether Amy is actually missing or whether this is another psychotic treasure-hunt for Nick as part of her terrible transformation into a “razor-wire knot daring me to unloop her” (49), but it does not seem like he is up to the job at all.

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    • I agree with your statement that because Amy’s character is represented through diary entries, her character seems “incredibly contrived” and “unbelievable.” We only know Amy’s character through either Nick’s depiction of her, or through Amy’s diary entries. The entries depict Amy as almost an angelic figure, doing everything right to try and make the marriage work, while Nick is depicted as the one solely ruining it. Amy successfully portrays herself as the victim in their marriage and Nick as the “bad guy.” However, Nick’s narration is filled with anger and hostility towards Amy, leading me to believe either Nick has an extreme hatred towards women, or Amy did something to make him this hostile. It is interesting that you say Amy’s diary entries are “appropriate for time pieces like Jane Eyre or Victorian novels” because in the reading for Wednesday (70-141) Amy references that time period and says she felt like one of those Victorian women when she moves back to Nick’s home town. I think Flynn (and Amy) is portraying Amy’s character in this way specifically as a part of a larger agenda. I do not believe Amy is this innocent Victorian-like woman she is presenting herself to be through her diary entries. To this extent, Nick’s character is more reliable than Amy’s because even though Nick may not recognize all of his own faults and remains extremely passive, helpless and weak, he does not pretend he is innocent in the collapse of his marriage and he acknowledges there are many things he could and wants to change about himself. I think it is a good idea to continue reading the novel with skeptic view of Amy’s narrative.

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  4. From the onset of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, Nick and Amy don’t seem to have the same view on the structure of their marriage. Nick feels that his wife is a nasty bitter woman throughout his dialogue. On the other hand, when reading through Amy’s diary, it seems that she is a very loving wife along with being very kind. I did find it interesting that Amy’s diary was a few years old meaning that her traits described during that time may be different than what they are in the present. She may be exactly the way Nick describes her, which can lead to the question, why has she changed? I also find it important to note that Nick doesn’t always regard women in the best manner. He likes women to be more like his sister since she is not a “typical” woman because she is not very feminine. Furthermore, I find that the role of woman so far in this novel is much like the way woman in Metamorphosis were portrayed since in both stories, a woman’s viewpoint or judgement is tossed aside while the men make all the decisions.

    A quote that really jumped out at me was right in the beginning when Nick said “And what’s inside it. I think of that too: her mind. Her brain, all those coils and her thoughts shuttling through those coils like fast, frantic centipedes. Like a child, I picture opening her skull, unspooling her brain and sifting through it, trying to catch and pin down her thoughts. What are you thinking, Amy? The question I’ve asked most often during our marriage, if not out loud, if not to the person who could answer. I suppose these questions stormcloud over every marriage: What are you thinking? how are you feeling? Who are you? What have we done to each other? What will we do?” (3). I believe that Nick really wants to understand his wife and wants her to feel comfortable sharing things that may be difficult for her. He wants to get closer to her but he feels that she is shutting him out and has no way to connect to her.

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    • I find it interesting that you compare this story to Metamorphosis. That did not strike me at first, but the ideas are very similar to that of Frankenstein as well in the idea that woman play almost a side role in the story. Nick forcing his wife to give up her livelihood in NY and moving to Missouri. Walton, being this crazy adrenaline junkie and wanting to be the first to discover this to be remembered and writing to his stay at home sister who never really is given any speaking roles except through return letters. This is what I think of when I think of the gender dynamics of what is going on in both of these books. What is also interesting is that although these two books are written by woman, they use the stereotypical woman in the story and the power they have and smarts they have over the men to critique the idea of how woman should be perceived in the new modern world. They no longer have to be the house wife pleasing their husband and yet Amy wants that. She doesn’t want to be the nagging wife who always wants to know where Nick is and simply wants to be loved and taken care of while the man does the decisions. As the story progresses though and Nick pushes her too far with the decision making though she seems to crack.

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  5. As we have observed in Dracula and Frankenstein, collections of letters and diaries make a thriller story more horrific because this style of writing makes the story realistic. Gone Girl is a mystery novel written in two forms of writing— present narration and past diaries. The diary entries are only by Amy, the missing wife, which is what makes the letters haunting. In order to get into Amy’s mind and character, the readers are only given her past thoughts which is unsettling because her present character is missing. Amy haunts the novel with her past life and words even though she is not present. Similar to the letters at the beginning of Dracula and Frankenstein, Amy’s letters are innocent and happy even though the readers know that things will eventually lead to demise. The first diary entry we read of Amy’s begins with, “Tra and la! I am smiling a big adopted-orphan smile as I write this. I am embarrassed at how happy I am, like some technicolor comic of a teenage girl talking on the phone with my hair in a ponytail, the bubble above my head saying: I met a boy!” (10). Amy’s writing is the epitome of absolute happiness. She is “embarrassed” by her happiness and says she has a “big adopted-orphan smile.” The giddiness of her voice is eerie because the readers know that the story will tumble downhill and that she will eventually go missing. The letters are what keeps readers turning the pages because they know that the letters were published for a reason and that something will happen to Amy in the future. Not only does the happiness of the letters foreshadow demise, but the letters also create tension because this style of writing is more realistic. Though the purpose of using letters in Dracula and Frankenstein is to create an otherworldly monster appear more realistic, the letters in Gone Girl serve as a simplified haunting. Though the diary entries are not Amy’s words as if she is a ghost, her words haunt Nick as if she is still alive.

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    • I absolutely agree that there are strong comparisons between Gone Girl and Dracula. To add to this “haunting” aspect of Amy’s letters, I believe under the surface of Amy’s letters, there some serious self convincing going on. There are instances that make me feel, as someone mentioned, that these entries are written by an unreliable narrator, and may be censored in a certain way. As the novel progresses we see Amy slip from her “happy” self, to something much more filled with conflict.

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  6. This is a very interesting beginning to a novel and gets the action started almost right away. The one thing that I noticed was this idea of feminism in the novel and how Flynn shows similarly to Shelley with Frankenstein a underrepresentation of strong female characters.
    The lot of what was read is out a text from a diary by the character showing how Amy needs to be seen as a stereotypical girl writing down her feelings in a diary. The first task we see Amy preforming is, “Amy peered at the crepe sizzling in the pan and licked something off her wrist. She looked triumphant, wifely. If I took her in my arms, she would smell like berries and powdered sugar.” (4). This characterizes her from the very beginning as the stereotypical house wife. She does the cooking and the cleaning. Flynn introduces us to a character through this and yet as we learn this woman is capable of so much more. Yet we get this demeaning first glimpse at her. This is very similar to the of what Shelley does in Frankenstein reducing her female characters to almost no real screen time and only a side role in helping Victor calm down. His sister is the one Victor writes to, in case he wants to be filled with confidence or self assurance.
    Both these authors offer us these stereotypical characters and yet in some lite these characters are the ones to drive the story. Amy is the central character in the plot of this novel. And the girl in the cottage and Victor’s sister, push bigger ideas across in the story of Frankenstein and how these woman live these passive lives and then are killed off, but in turn show strength in their sacrifice.

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    • I didn’t think of a connection between Frankenstein and Gone Girl but now that you mention I do see it. Feminism is a big part in both novels since in Frankenstein, Shelly wanted to have her view accepted but in order for her to do that, she must use male narrator, in addition to what you pointed out. Also with respect to the quote you used, I didn’t realize that Amy was being depicted as a stereotypical house wife, but it makes sense since Flynn states that Amy is sizzling the pan. Also, you can think about if this novel is a bit sexist from comments that Nick has said about women thus far and also how Nick’s father thought of women.

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  7. A common device running throughout Flynn’s novel is the way she uses foreshadowing and a tone of mystery in which the narrator knows more than the reader does. Another novel I think of immediately that incorporates this same device is Morrison’s Beloved. For example, Nick reveals clues to readers in mysterious segments such as “This was my eleventh lie. The Amy of today was abrasive enough to want to hurt, sometimes…” (Flynn 49). Instead of revealing his intentions of lying first, he reveals the information he has relayed to the police as a lie to readers afterwards. Morrison uses this element of mysticism through the character of Beloved. We are not sure how she knows certain information about Sethe and the family history, but certain aspects are revealed in a sporadic order towards the reader. Although both Flynn’s text and Morrison’s text are radically different, coming from two different worlds and time periods, by using the same device, it emulates a similar tone within each of their novels. The mysticism adds a supernatural element in a world we know is free of it.

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    • Furthermore, both Gone Girl and Beloved play with the concept of time. The present cannot escape the past to the point where the two unclearly intertwine. In Beloved there is certain questionable clarity, and in Gone Girl, the reader is outrightly given two separate time lines which further distinguishing each character’s mind.

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  8. In Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl” has a theme of luck and fate meaning that things just happen because of the time and place of the characters. This being said, it closely resembles A Cool Million because the main character of the short story had nothing but either good or bad luck come his way resulting in his death in the end. In this story, Nick is having bad luck come his way with him losing his job and having to move. This is close to A Cool Million because Lem had to move to New York City to create opportunity for himself after his mother died. Even though Amy doesn’t support where they are at, she keeps working but then is fired from her job also which is another stroke of bad luck for the family. In addition to this, Nicks parents are both dying which is never good news to hear when you lose your job and it is a struggle to provide for yourself. Because of this, he moves back home to take care of his dying parents. This story so far is similar to A Cool Million because of all the pitfalls that both characters go through early in the story and can’t control. It introduces the theme of fate and disaster that no one wants to acknowledge because it leaves a bad taste in the readers mouth going forward. My question is why would Flynn start off the novel with several notions of bad news instead of introducing the bad luck straight into the novel instead of later where it was more apprpriate?

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  9. While this Gone Girl is set in the contemporary world, I’ve so far found it be the most unsettling piece we’ve read this semester, perhaps for its depiction of monstrosity in such a way that seems normal. Gone Girl brings gender dynamics into question in a way similar to Dracula. Much of this first section of reading consists of setting up the background of Nick and Amy’s relationship leading up to Amy’s disappearance. Like Dracula, Gone Girl uses multiple perspectives to portray conceptual tensions, taking the view of both Amy’s sincerely sarcastic diary entries, and Nick’s lackluster stream of consciousness. The result is an inside look at a “normal”, but misdirected relationship.

    Dracula degraded Mina through men underestimating her capabilities, and her function to the group. Van Helsing’s points out the reasoning behind her successes is having a “man brain”. Here we saw a criticism towards the absurdity of standard gender roles. Gone Girl approaches these same gender roles from a modern perspective, in which we question their lingering influence on society. Amy uses sarcasm as way to accept her confirmation to gender norms stating, “I have become a wife, I have become a bore, I have been asked to forfeit my Independent Young Feminist Card. I don’t care”(38). While totally happy to be married, there’s a sense of defense that Amy puts up here, as if to reclaim her independence that would be lost in not only accepting the company of a man, but enjoying it.

    Amy entertains the idea of Nick more than his actual character. After meeting him again on Seventh Avenue, Amy romanticizes a life with Nick stating, “You both find the exact same things worth remembering (Just one olive, though.)You have the same rhythm. Click. You just know each other”(30). She alludes back to her earlier entry in which Amy makes up a memory that the two might share together, if they indeed got together after meeting at a party. While meant to be a mere romanticization, it seems that Amy may actually seek more of this ideal relationship rather than her actual one. Nick attests to the fact that they aren’t as alike as she originally made them out to be, stating on their first anniversary,“Amy, I don’t get why I have to prove my love to you by remembering the exact same things you do, the exact same way you do”(20).

    I think Gone Girl is getting at ideas of the contemporary fabrication of relationships, and how they can conflict with the ideals behind gender roles. While in a way we have erased an aspect of inferiority towards women (obviously, not enough), we still struggle with how the ideal relationship is portrayed in society, and in turn may lead us towards exaggerating qualities of the storybook marriage that aren’t really there.

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  10. A theme that seems to permeate both contemporary and traditional literature is marriage. That proves to be true for both Gone Girl and other texts we have read during this fiction course, such as Frankenstein, The Road and Metamorphosis. One of the moments that was most striking to me about marriage in the first portion of “Gone Girl” happens in the Nick’s first entrée. Nick is talking about how Amy had always been terrible at memorizing song lyrics and as he recounts a tale about the early stage in his relationship he says “I knew I liked her then, really liked her, this girls with an explanation for everything” (Flynn 7). Flynn uses an interesting strategy here, in which he talks about the couple in a way that seems entirely hopeful, and even romantic, giving the reader room to appreciate the couple and perhaps sympathize with their relationship. However, immediately after he tells the “cute couple story” he follows with a daunting quote that really stuck with me. It reads: “There’s something disturbing about recalling a warm memory and feeling utterly cold” (Flynn 7). All the empathy and compassion that had been previously built-up by the tale of the couple is gone and we are left with unsatisfactory feelings about the relationship of the couple. The ability Flynn has to create ups and downs in the storyline of the couple and confuse the reader about the intricate love affair between the protagonists is part of what makes the text so captivating. This strategy continues to play out throughout the rest of the reading, as we are unclear about who is the villain, and who is the hero, and which narrators we chose to trust. It is very interesting to compare this to the marriage storyline that takes place in the “The Road”. First off- Gone Girl in entirely more ambiguous: it is very unclear whose side in the marriage the reader should take. This is highly in contrast with what we see in “The Road”, because after the mom kills herself it becomes quite hard to defend her after she leaves her child. Secondly, we only have on narrative voice in “The Road” which is different than what we see with the changing narrative styles in “Gone Girl”. As we read the post-apocalyptic novel, we have no choice but to trust our third-voice narrator, but that doesn’t seem to be true about Gone Girl, since we have more than one unreliable narrator.

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    • I think it is really interesting how you compare the marriage between Nick and Amy with the marriage in The Road. Both novels do indeed set the marriages up into competitions. As readers, we must choose a side. The difference between the two seems to be that in Gone Girl, we gain insight into Amy’s thoughts through her diary entries, while in The Road we only ever get the man’s point of view. Having Amy’s point of view, no matter how reliable or not it is, allows readers to gain an unbiased perspective over how they feel about the marriage. I do also agree with you in that Flynn makes the relationship quite ambiguous. We are unsure as to why Nick feels so negatively towards his positive memories with his wife, which leads readers to believe that we are going to find out at some point in the novel. It is Flynn’s way of using foreshadowing, and creating suspense within the narrative.

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  11. Both in Bram Stoker’s, Dracula and in Gillian Flynn’s, Gone Girl there is a question of what it means to be female.
    “I know, I know, I am being a girl,” (Flynn 66) is a statement that Amy keeps bringing up in one of her later 2010 diary entries. Fretting over her the date and dismissed events of her third wedding anniversary, Amy finds herself feeling like all her actions and reactions are nothing but a jumble of romantic-mindless-nothingness. Legitimately upset, she finds reason to continuously downplay her and toss away her emotions in attempts to justify her husband, Nick and even passively comfort him. Amy scorns herself for a type of similar behavior that defines both Lucy and Mina throughout, Dracula. Of course, Lucy finds her infatuation with men promising and dominant in her identity, while Mina slowly allows the focus of men to take over her life. Yet, despite Stoker’s intimate letter-format, neither woman ever question there roles. Flynn’s diaries makes Stoker’s diaries look closed off and written with the intent of presentation. Flynn writes unforgivingly, presenting every corner and passing thought in each character’s mind.
    Time also contributes to Flynn’s growing presentation of sexism as Flynn sets back Amy’s diaries beginning in 2005, “He doesn’t ask me what I do, which is fine, which is a change,” (Flynn 13) in sequence with Nick’s interpretation of the present. Amy’s first job alone as a “personality quiz writer” diminishes her sense of self as a working woman, because though she is extremely qualified she believes her title to be “girly” rather than successful. Further on, from the couple’s first meeting, Flynn foreshadows a growing theme of sexism as Nick then fails to inquire about Amy’s professional life at all, acting strictly as a man who “carries himself as a guy who gets laid a lot,” (Flynn 12). So, later in 2010 when Nick loses his job and Amy attempts to soothe his financial stress by implying, “My money is your money,” (Flynn 68), Nick immediately dismisses her claim just as he earlier dismissed even the idea of her career.

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    • I totally agree with your idea of the pursuit of rejecting typical “female” characteristics by these characters. Amy seems to be trying so incredibly hard not to be a “typical” woman who forces her husband to do things for her and be a “dancing monkey”, and criticizing women who do. Meanwhile her relaxed attitude towards Nick and her refusal to verbally communicate what’s wrong is allowing him to do things that really bother her like stay out incredibly late and get other women’s phone numbers. These actions rightly bother her because she isn’t being true to herself by letting Nick run amok and just stuffing everything inside. Then from Nick’s point of view he reads her treasure hunt clues and is forced to try to read her mind, something he’s definitely not mentally equipped to do. In the desperate attempt to not be “typical” and “demanding”, there is a gaping lack of communication in the relationship, which could lead to any kinds of crazy actions from either partner because of their pent up resentment, because both characters obviously state the way they bottle up their emotions which can only lead to a pressurized explosion.

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